I Must Be Doing Something Right

I am in my Woman Rivetingwork truck, at the bank, holding a check which bears a feminine name (my spouse’s) and an androgynous name (mine). Well, not my work truck, but my boss’s truck, and it is even way worse than my truck, except that some of the equipment in it works better, sometimes. Diesel and chemicals leak out through the holes through which I can see the macadam below. Soot blankets the inside of the cab, because the chimney in the back of the truck is clogged. Yes, there is a chimney in the back of my truck. I mean my boss’s truck.

I couldn’t be any less of a girl as I insert the payment stub and check into the pneumatic canister. My hair is cropped short. I smell like the diesel, bleach, and sulfuric acid which saturate my worn out Dickies work clothes and wet boots. Probably I have grease smudges on my face from crawling around inside the diesel engine in the back of my truck making repairs, before giving up and calling for a new truck. The “girls” are tucked safely into a tight sports bra. I have no feminine accoutrements to rely on.

As the can whizzes through the tube, I think, that is all right. I learned from my mother (I know that I was hard on her last week) that the measure of a woman is not in whether she has a “woman’s” job, follows orders from a man, has on heels or jewelry, wears make-up or feminine clothing, or goes to the hair dresser (my mother has always gone to the barber). These lessons have stuck with me. I am no less woman because I don’t submit to most of the “rules” of what women are supposed to be. As a transgender female, that makes it even tougher on me. Fortunately, I also inherited stubbornness from my mother.

But still, I am pleasantly surprised when the cashier looks at the names on the check, and calls me by the feminine name (my spouses). Some chatter ensues. She calls me “Ms. D.” She makes an attempt at selling me a new checking account. She calls me by my spouse’s name again, and I drive off with a big smile on my face.

Chalk up a big point for the cashier, and for the bank. And knock off one big chunk of insecurity that I sometimes feel about how people see me.

(the image is Rosie the Riveter, library of congress, 1943, significantly altered by me)

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5 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. georgiakevin
    Oct 11, 2014 @ 11:44:52

    hat a lovely wonderful post! Keep on keeping on dear!

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    Reply

  2. Lesboi
    Oct 11, 2014 @ 12:35:21

    I’m dealing with similar insecurities right now myself. Congrats on your positive interaction at the bank. These kinds of interchanges can bring up a ton of anxiety, I know.

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    Reply

    • The Final Rinse
      Oct 12, 2014 @ 10:47:56

      Thanks for reading.
      The funny thing was that this was a total “no anxiety” interaction. This was not my usual bank branch: I was just an anonymous blurry face at a drive through. So I was pleasantly surprised.
      At my usual bank branch, they all know me as female. I would hesitate to go there in my work truck, lest they start to look at me as male. Events like this one show how distorted that kind of thinking is.

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      Reply

      • Lesboi
        Oct 12, 2014 @ 11:47:24

        I find that those “anonymous blurry face” interchanges with strangers are where I get read correctly the most. They don’t already “know” you as one thing or look too hard at you. They tend to pick up one gender cue and go with that…maybe the voice or hair style or a piece of clothing, or maybe just our energy.

        Liked by 1 person

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